LIBR 513

CATALOGUING SPECIAL AND NON-BOOK MATERIALS

PREREQUISITES:
MLIS and Dual MAS/MLIS: LIBR 500, LIBR 501, LIBR 502
MAS: completion of MAS core and permission of the iSchool Graduate Advisor

GOALS:

  • Understand and utilize the historical and current theories and principles, as well as the traditional and nontraditional descriptive cataloguing techniques that serve as the basis of descriptive cataloguing practice.
  • Create and/or interpret and evaluate what someone else has created, i.e. bibliographic descriptions for a variety of serial and other special materials
  • To establish name access points for those materials according to international standards adopted by the library community, and in the context of computer-based storage and retrieval systems.
  • Assess the relevance of descriptive cataloguing in modern library and non-library efforts to organize and provide access to information.
  • Have a command of the major tools and resources for the bibliographic control of monographs and serials and other special materials, and of the current issues and trends in their management.

OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course you should show evidence of the development of confidence and skill in a number of areas related to the content of LIBR513. Specifically, you should be able to:

  • Identify and understand the significance of the different bibliographic situations that arise in monographs [and other book-like documents/information packages], as well as in the range of serial and other “special” materials
  • Sense when a bibliographic situation can give rise to some problem, identify the nature of the problem, and develop some strategy for dealing with it
  • Exercise judgement and interpret the purpose of the rules in cases where their literal application may not seem to immediately fit the situation
  • Assess the nature of the content of the material, not just its bibliographic presentation, in deciding upon the choice and application of rules
  • Assess which policies appear best for a particular environment, for example, in the choice among options, in relating rules to available technologies, and in deciding what is cost-effective
  • Judge the value, in a given situation, of expending more or less effort on searching for and recording bibliographic data, and assess the applicability for local use of metadata derived from other source
  • Assess and evaluate your own and others’ attempts at bibliographic control.

CONTENT:

  • Review of Description, including ISBD and MARC
  • Name Access points, Choice of Name Access Points
  • Name Authority Control
  • Personal Names
  • Corporate Names
  • Names of Works
  • Uniform Titles. Name. Title Access Points
  • “Traditional” Serials, E-journals, other Electronic Materials
  • Bibliographical Control of Special Materials